Boston Nightlife

After a night of passionate culture nurturing another type of hunger makes it’s way: the dinning hour. In Boston, restaurants are like a second or many times first home for locals and travelers of course.

From early in the morning till late in the night, delicatessen and tasty pastries, traditional and nouvelle cuisine style blend to offer visitors the best gastronomy of the city. The traditional Boston Baked Beans famous since colonial times welcome any taste seeker who is in search of embracing local flavors.

And if it happens to be august, then Boston restaurant week welcomes visitors to taste the city’s flavors and ingenious cuisine. Boston’s chefs mix traditional dishes with new tendencies inspired in European cuisine as well as Asian and Latin American.

For all cuisine fans that are planning to walk about Boston streets this august, there is a must to attend to Boston restaurant week is going to offer the great combination of tastes and flavours at the restaurants taking part in this already tradition event every year.

And the Boston night continues after a copious dinner to have a drink or two to lounge bars and pubs scattered all over the city. The Waterfront neighborhood of Boston has emerged as the nightlife most fashionable area of the city where a pubs and bars such as Tia’s on the Waterfront welcome visitors after a day of town-walking or a full day of work offering cold bears and frozen margaritas in summer and hot beverages in winter.

And when the morning sets in the city of Boston, everyone starts their way home to the hotels or houses in and on the outskirts. Needless to say that for those who have had a bit too much margaritas or any alcoholic beverages to cool the night or warm it, the best way and the safest way to get home is by taking a Boston cab, by subway, by bus.

An so it ends another night in the old city capital of Massachusetts. The city is now at rest to gather energy for the nest night in down town Waterfront, ready to welcome Bostoners and foreigners.

Freedom Trail Boston Restaurant Guide – Historic Restaurants Make Your Visit More Fun

For those visiting Boston’s fantastic Freedom Trail and who wish the most immersive experience, there are a number of historic restaurants directly associated with the Revolutionary-era that are on or close to the Freedom Trail. These will absolutely make your Freedom Trail experience more fun and authentic.

The restaurants range from simple pubs with inexpensive sandwiches to fine dining. They all are fun, scenic, serve good food and are suitable for families. Most have excellent lunch specials, some even including lobster – every Boston visitor needs at least one!

1654 – Green Dragon Tavern, 11 Marshall Street, 617-237-2114

The original Green Dragon Tavern was around the corner at 84 Union Street. It was founded in 1654 and was an operating pub by 1714. The Green Dragon was a regular haunt for the Sons of Liberty and the site of the Boston Tea Party planning meetings. The old building was torn down in 1828.

The current Green Dragon incarnation is fun, serves good bar food and often features lobster specials at lunch. It is located on Marshall Street, one of the oldest most authentically historic in Boston. Right next door is the Ebenezer Hancock House – which was built in 1767 by John Hancock’s uncle, inherited by John, and then given to his brother, Ebenezer. Ebenezer became the deputy paymaster to the Continental Army.

1742 – Union Oyster House, 44 Union Street, 617-227-2750

The Union Oyster House started serving food in 1826. It is the oldest continuously operating restaurant in the US. The building, which dates from 1742 (although other references place it as early as 1713), started its life as a dress shop. At that time, the harbor actually came up to the dress shop’s back door. Since then, all the land you see is filled-in.

The legendary Oyster Bar at the front of the restaurant is beautiful. Daniel Webster sat daily at this bar and drank a tall tumbler of brandy and water with each half-dozen oysters – usually eating at least six plates.

1760 – Chart House (John Hancock’s Counting House), 60 Long Wharf, 617-227-1576

The Chart House was originally the Gardiner House, built on Long Wharf around 1760. Later, it was John Hancock’s counting house. It is the oldest building still in use on Long Wharf.

A short walk from the Freedom Trail, it is the most elegant restaurant in this collection. For the warm weather, it has outside seating with a great view of the harbor and downtown Boston. Check for discounts on food.

1780 – Warren Tavern, 2 Pleasant Street, Charlestown (near Bunker Hill), 617-241-8142

Built in 1780, the Warren Tavern was reportedly the first building raised after the British burned Charlestown during the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. It is named for Doctor and General Joseph Warren, the famous Patriot who died fighting at Bunker Hill. The Tavern has been host to George Washington, Paul Revere, and Benjamin Franklin. Try the Paul Revere Burger.

1827 – Durgin Park, 340 Faneuil Hall Place (Quincy Market North Building), 617-227-2038

This iconic restaurant, housed in an old warehouse, has been around since 1827, although a restaurant has operated at this spot since 1742. Famous for its old Yankee recipes, it is a real flash from the past and one of the oldest places you can dine in Boston. Upstairs diners sit communally at long tables with other patrons. For the pleasant weather, there is also outside seating overlooking Quincy Market.

It is a lot of fun and one of the few places you can get Indian Pudding. The roast beef overflows the plate. One of the best!

1875 – Cafe Marliave, 10 Bosworth Street 617-422-0004

The oldest Italian restaurant in Boston, the Marliave dates from 1875. It has intimate outside seating for the summer months. It is only a short block away from Old City Hall and King’s Chapel stops on the Freedom Trail.

The Marliave is located right above of the Province House Steps (1679-1864). The Province House was the official Royal Governor’s residence during the Revolutionary period.

Have a great trip!

Wireless Sound Systems – Boston Acoustics TVee Powered Soundbar Speaker System

Although anybody can learn to appreciate the joy of a high-end home theater system, not all of us are willing to fork out the amount of cash to purchase one. Also, there are many of us who are not willing to ruin the aesthetics of our room by installing a bulky 7 piece sound system in our living room. Boston Acoustics has come up with a system that creates a beautiful balance between form and function. Here is a quick review of the Boston Acoustics TVee Powered soundbar wireless speaker system.

This model consists of one stereo sound bar and a wireless sub-woofer. Simplicity is the spirit behind this sound system. From its design to its functions, everything from setting up to using this system is simple. Besides the power cable, you would only need to connect one single cable from the speaker to the TV and you are done!

The wireless sub-woofer can be placed anywhere around the room. All it needs is a power socket nearby. As subwoofers are bulky and often unsightly, it is very helpful that you can neatly tuck it away in a corner. Unlike many sub-woofer designs, the sub-woofer that comes with the Boston Acoustics TVee Powered soundbar wireless speaker system boasts a sleek and unconventional design. It resembles more of a tiny stool rather than a speaker. Cute!

The main sound bar is powered by 100 watts of energy, which is more than enough to complement the in-built speakers of your TV. The audio produce from the speakers are pretty good, perfect for a small or medium sized room. Another cool feature is its remote system. The sound bar automatically learns to adjust to the signals of your TV’s remote. The volume of the speakers increases and decreases according to your TV’s volume control.