Bar Tool Time

No matter what task is before an individual, you must have the proper tools to accomplish the job. If you are a chef, you will need fine quality knives and an extensive range of various pots and pans. If you are a gardener, you will need several sizes of pruning shears and clippers, as well as digging tools to keep your yard trim and beautiful. And if you want to tend bar, whether in the home or professionally, to make quality drinks which everyone will enjoy, you will need your box of bar tools, which will allow you to turn out delicious concoctions.

Having the correct tools will ease the job of making good drinks. Let’s take a look at the most essential tools:

  • A BOTTLE OPENER is a must, both for speed and for the health of your hands. Using your bare hands to open bottles of beer can quickly turn your palms and fingers to bundles of cuts and scratches, not to mention chafing them raw. There are many varieties of bottle openers available to suit individual tastes.
  • The “waiter’s wine opener” is probably the most versatile type of WINE OPENER/CORKSCREW. Very efficient, it will not break the cork (famous last words!). This tool is multi-purposed: It includes a bottle opener; a sharp blade for cutting the seal of the wine; and the all-important corkscrew or worm. Corkscrews can be found in all sorts of novelty shapes. Also, if possible, get an opener with a two-level lever for maximum efficiency. A winged corkscrew is screwed into the cork which is popped by pulling down the handles.
  • A necessity for all bartenders is the COCKTAIL SHAKER, a stainless steel container used to vigorously shake the ingredients for a martini. A good rule of bartending is to remember that the colder a drink gets, the better it will taste. Hence, the shaker. Pouring pre-chilled ingredients into the shaker with ice, shaking it vigorously, and serving the drink in a chilled glass will give your guests a tongue-titillating libation.
  • The two basic types of shakers are the STANDARD SHAKER and the BOSTON SHAKER. The STANDARD or COBBLER shaker is a three-piece stainless steel shaker with a strainer built into it. It consists of the shaker tumbler, a lid with strainer, and the cap. The BOSTON shaker is a bit simpler in its design than is the Standard. It is merely a shaker tumbler and a slightly smaller mixing glass. All that needs to be done with a Boston shaker is to seal the two parts together. You must be careful to not seal it so tightly that it cannot be opened again.
  • There are many different varieties of STRAINERS, the most popular of which being the HAWTHORNE, a flat, spoon-shaped tool. A spring coil fits around its head, enabling it to fit all types and shapes of bar glasses, by means of prongs, in order to strain cocktails. On the other hand, the stainless steel JULEP strainer fits gently within the glass at an angle.

Several other tools will help you tend bar with professional ease.

  • A BAR SPOON is used mainly for stirring, the measurement of ingredients, and the crushing of flavoring (fruit, etc.) ingredients. Made of stainless steel, most bar spoons are 10 inches long and hold 1/6 ounce (one teaspoon) of liquid.
  • On most upper-end bar spoons, the top of the handle is a disc known as a MUDDLER which is used to crush (muddle) chunks of fruit, sugar cubes, or herbs, such as mint leaves, in the bottom of the glass.
  • A good BLENDER is essential for making frozen drinks, such as Daiquiris or Margaritas. There are many sorts of blenders with various speeds. Be sure to put your liquid in the blender before adding ice; doing this will increase the life of your blade. Try to get a blender with ice crushing capabilities. If you cannot get such a blender, you should invest in a freestanding ice crusher, independent of the blender.
  • TONGS and an ICE BUCKET are necessary for the sanitary storage and transfer of ice cubes. Not only will things be more hygienic but the ice bucket will help prevent the melting (and subsequent mess) of your ice cubes.
  • The BAR MEASURE or JIGGER is indispensable in making accurate measurements. One side of a stainless steel JIGGER holds 1-1/2 oz (50 ml) of liquid; the other side, called a PONY, holds 3/4 oz (25 ml). There is generally only one size to a glass jigger, one ounce (2 tablespoons).
  • A KNIFE and CUTTING BOARD are important tools to have at hand for cutting ingredients and garnishes. Recommended are a sharp 4-inch long paring knife and a sharp kitchen knife of about 8 inches, such as a bread knife or tomato knife, with a spearlike tip. The sharper the knife, the easier to make a clean cut. Watch for your fingers!
  • A POUR SPOUT or POURER gives you greater control when pouring from a bottle. Generally, it is a small bar tool made of plastic or rubber/metal which fits onto the neck of your liquor bottle. It gives you better control than pouring directly from the bottle. The most precise of the pour spouts are fashioned of a rubber cork fitted into the bottle and a metal spout which fits into the cork. Different styles of pour spouts include those of plastic, metal, neon, glow in the dark, slow pour (3 seconds per ounce), fast pour, screened, flapped, and measured.
  • Finally, to add a special something to your bar, use a GARNISH TRAY to hold all the accoutrements that give class to your presentation. Be sure to remember to put out skewers, plastic swords, paper parasols, flags, etc. along with your cocktail napkins, straws, and stirrers. Suggested garnishes might include lemon and orange slices/wedges, maraschino cherries, celery stalks, olives, and cocktail onions – whatever your imagination conjures up to tantalize your taste buds.

Cheers!

Boston Gay Dating – What Are Your Options?

Boston gay dating is extremely popular now, and you have bars, clubs and gay online dating services to thank for that. Your choice isn’t limited at all when it comes to meeting gay singles in Boston.

If you like the club scene you have plenty of variety so there’s something for everyone.

Jacques Underground and Cabaret

Jacques is a two tier club that carters for gay Boston singles who enjoy alternative music, or live entertainment from female impersonators. You will also be able to enjoy bachelorette nights as well.

Avalon

Avalon is a gay nightclub that holds 2,000 people who can enjoy loud music, and huge dance floors. There’s also a stage for entertainment. If you like to enjoy yourself with a night of dancing then this is probably the place for you.

The Alley

The Alley is a Boston gay bar that has been around for 26 years. You can enjoy pool nights, karaoke nights and even bear chested nights. As you can see you get a bit of variety for your Boston Gay dating depending on what you or your partner are into.

If you want to meet someone online first before you start going to bars and clubs there are a few excellent gay online dating web sites that have thousands of gay singles from Boston enjoying the benefits of their services.

All you need to do is read a few reviews online then you can decide where you want to post your profile and start meeting other singles from Boston. Online dating gives you the advantage of getting to know someone before you actually go on a date with them.

Freedom Trail Boston Restaurant Guide – Historic Restaurants Make Your Visit More Fun

For those visiting Boston’s fantastic Freedom Trail and who wish the most immersive experience, there are a number of historic restaurants directly associated with the Revolutionary-era that are on or close to the Freedom Trail. These will absolutely make your Freedom Trail experience more fun and authentic.

The restaurants range from simple pubs with inexpensive sandwiches to fine dining. They all are fun, scenic, serve good food and are suitable for families. Most have excellent lunch specials, some even including lobster – every Boston visitor needs at least one!

1654 – Green Dragon Tavern, 11 Marshall Street, 617-237-2114

The original Green Dragon Tavern was around the corner at 84 Union Street. It was founded in 1654 and was an operating pub by 1714. The Green Dragon was a regular haunt for the Sons of Liberty and the site of the Boston Tea Party planning meetings. The old building was torn down in 1828.

The current Green Dragon incarnation is fun, serves good bar food and often features lobster specials at lunch. It is located on Marshall Street, one of the oldest most authentically historic in Boston. Right next door is the Ebenezer Hancock House – which was built in 1767 by John Hancock’s uncle, inherited by John, and then given to his brother, Ebenezer. Ebenezer became the deputy paymaster to the Continental Army.

1742 – Union Oyster House, 44 Union Street, 617-227-2750

The Union Oyster House started serving food in 1826. It is the oldest continuously operating restaurant in the US. The building, which dates from 1742 (although other references place it as early as 1713), started its life as a dress shop. At that time, the harbor actually came up to the dress shop’s back door. Since then, all the land you see is filled-in.

The legendary Oyster Bar at the front of the restaurant is beautiful. Daniel Webster sat daily at this bar and drank a tall tumbler of brandy and water with each half-dozen oysters – usually eating at least six plates.

1760 – Chart House (John Hancock’s Counting House), 60 Long Wharf, 617-227-1576

The Chart House was originally the Gardiner House, built on Long Wharf around 1760. Later, it was John Hancock’s counting house. It is the oldest building still in use on Long Wharf.

A short walk from the Freedom Trail, it is the most elegant restaurant in this collection. For the warm weather, it has outside seating with a great view of the harbor and downtown Boston. Check for discounts on food.

1780 – Warren Tavern, 2 Pleasant Street, Charlestown (near Bunker Hill), 617-241-8142

Built in 1780, the Warren Tavern was reportedly the first building raised after the British burned Charlestown during the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. It is named for Doctor and General Joseph Warren, the famous Patriot who died fighting at Bunker Hill. The Tavern has been host to George Washington, Paul Revere, and Benjamin Franklin. Try the Paul Revere Burger.

1827 – Durgin Park, 340 Faneuil Hall Place (Quincy Market North Building), 617-227-2038

This iconic restaurant, housed in an old warehouse, has been around since 1827, although a restaurant has operated at this spot since 1742. Famous for its old Yankee recipes, it is a real flash from the past and one of the oldest places you can dine in Boston. Upstairs diners sit communally at long tables with other patrons. For the pleasant weather, there is also outside seating overlooking Quincy Market.

It is a lot of fun and one of the few places you can get Indian Pudding. The roast beef overflows the plate. One of the best!

1875 – Cafe Marliave, 10 Bosworth Street 617-422-0004

The oldest Italian restaurant in Boston, the Marliave dates from 1875. It has intimate outside seating for the summer months. It is only a short block away from Old City Hall and King’s Chapel stops on the Freedom Trail.

The Marliave is located right above of the Province House Steps (1679-1864). The Province House was the official Royal Governor’s residence during the Revolutionary period.

Have a great trip!