Enjoy a Memorable Holiday in the Lively City of Boston

Boston is the capital of Massachusetts. It is one of the oldest and most popular places in the United States. As the largest city in New England, it has been termed as the unofficial “capital of New England”. It is best known for its libraries, cultural manifestations, universities and colonial architecture.

The city is usually crowded by tourists all year round. So any time can be appropriate to visit, depending on what you are looking for. Fall is generally a good time to go on account of pleasant weather and special events. However, prices are higher at this time and availability of hotels and restaurants is difficult. While winter is a bit bitter, you might want to experience the indoor activities such as theater, food and wine festivals that it has to offer. You are also likely to obtain cheap tickets to Boston in this season. Summer is the hottest time of the year, so think twice before visiting during this season.

Logan International Airport, situated in the East Boston neighborhood, handles most of the flights to Boston. Aer Lingus is one of the flights offering huge airline discounts. Delta Airlines, KLM and Air Canada also operate cheap flights to Boston. If you are planning a visit in May, June, September and October you should book your tickets well in advance to get cheap airline tickets.

Culture of this amazing city has its roots in New England. There are a number of ornate theaters, like Boston Opera House. Thanks to a thriving underground music scene, the city has a variety of music. From bands like Boston and Aerosmith to countless local musicians, the world-renowned Boston Symphony Orchestra, indie rock and hip hop, there are tons of things for music lovers. Many of the world famous music schools are located in Boston. This city also gave birth to the hardcore rock genre of music.

The city has a lively and colorful African American Culture. The three cities Mattapan, Roxbury and Dorchester, which have Blue Hill Avenue running through them, comprise a giant community of African American people. Along with Caribbean, Chinese and soul food restaurants, the Avenue has many hair and nail salons.

There are many significant festivals and events in Boston. Annual events like St. Patrick’s Day and Boston Marathon are famous the world over. It is also one of the first cities to host the annual First Night Festival, a major arts and activity festival. The Boston LBGT Pride parade and festival, witnesses around 400000 participants each June.

Museums are another attraction in Boston. They are plentiful and cater to most interests. The famed Museum of Fine Arts has a prestigious collection, which people come to see from all over the world. Boston Children’ Museum and The MIT Museum are other places you should visit.

The city’s cuisine is inherited from New England as well. It gives a lot of importance to seafood and dairy products. The New England clam chowder is one of the best dishes of the city. There are also a variety of Asian and Italian restaurants. All in all, the city is a foodie’s paradise.

City’s nightlife is renowned around the world. It has plenty of bars and nightclubs to choose from. Most clubs even have souvenir shops for tourists. There are many dive bars and brewery tours available as well.

Boston Cruises – A Best Kept Cruise Secret

Boston Cruises are a fantastic way to begin or end a vacation. You know Boston, of course. The Old State House, Faneuil Hall, the Boston Tea Party, Old Ironsides. You could explore the city forever. But why not do your exploring as a prelude to some vacation time on a cruise?

Yes, a cruise. Boston has been one of America’s leading ports since before we were America. Holland America sails the Maasdam out of Boston. Norwegian Cruise Lines sails the Norwegian Majesty, the Norwegian Gem and the Norwegian Dream. Royal Caribbean offers the Jewel of the Seas. Your choices for cruise lines, ships, and itineraries are varied enough that everyone should find some rest and relaxation.

The Maasdam is the one of Holland America’s smaller ships, and the smallest of the ships sailing out of Boston. Placed in service in 1993, she displaces 55,000 tons and can carry approximately 1200 passengers. Being an older ship, cabins on this cruise vessel are a little larger than on the newer ships. The Maasdam sails from Boston on a circular, 7-day tour of Newport, Rhode Island; Portland, Maine; St. John, New Brunswick, Canada; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Bar Harbor, Maine; and returning to Boston.

This is a lovely cruise to take in the fall, when the New England landscape lights up with legendary colors. Bring some warmer clothes and enjoy a drink out on the deck while you watch some gorgeous scenery go by.

Another cruise the Maasdam sails on is the 7-night Canada and New England discovery, which visits Bar Harbor, Maine; Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Sydney, Nova Scotia; Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island; cruises up Saguenay Fjord in Quebec; then visits Quebec City and finally docks in Montreal. If you yearn for more time aboard ship, she also has a 17-day “Voyage of the Vikings” that leaves Boston, and visits Sydney, Nova Scotia; Corner Brook, Newfoundland; Qaqortoq, Greenland; Isafjord, Akureyri, and Seydisfjiordur, Iceland; Lerwick, Scotland; Stavanger and Oslo, Norway; and finally docking in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Another smallish ship (as cruise ships go) is Norwegian Cruise Line’s Norwegian Majesty. She was built in 1992 and completely refurbished in 1999. The Norwegian Majesty has been stretched to 680 feet and now displaces almost 41,000 tons. She sails round-trip from Boston to Bermuda, and back again. In 2008 Norwegian’s Dream will take over this route and the 7-day Canada and New England route will be offered.

In September and October, Royal Caribbean’s Jewel of the Seas sails for 7 days on its Canada and New England cruises. This is a roundtrip cruise from Boston to Martha’s Vineyard; Portland, Maine; Bar Harbor, Maine; Halifax, Nova Scotia; and Saint John, New Brunswick. There is also a shorter, 5-night cruise that eliminates St. John, New Brunswick from the cruise.

Jewel of the Seas is 962 feet long and displaces over 90,000 tons. She offers a sports court and rock climbing wall, solarium, fitness center, casino, day spa and dedicated youth facilities. There’s something on board for everyone, no matter your mood.

Consider sailing Royal Caribbean from Boston to warmer climes with their 10-night Caribbean cruise. Leave the cool weather of Boston and head for Puerto Rico, St Thomas, St Maarten and Aruba. The ship docks at the end of the trip in Miami, Florida.

Boston cruises are not particularly well-known. But this best-kept secret can offer you value that few other cruisers will find.

Freedom Trail Boston Restaurant Guide – Historic Restaurants Make Your Visit More Fun

For those visiting Boston’s fantastic Freedom Trail and who wish the most immersive experience, there are a number of historic restaurants directly associated with the Revolutionary-era that are on or close to the Freedom Trail. These will absolutely make your Freedom Trail experience more fun and authentic.

The restaurants range from simple pubs with inexpensive sandwiches to fine dining. They all are fun, scenic, serve good food and are suitable for families. Most have excellent lunch specials, some even including lobster – every Boston visitor needs at least one!

1654 – Green Dragon Tavern, 11 Marshall Street, 617-237-2114

The original Green Dragon Tavern was around the corner at 84 Union Street. It was founded in 1654 and was an operating pub by 1714. The Green Dragon was a regular haunt for the Sons of Liberty and the site of the Boston Tea Party planning meetings. The old building was torn down in 1828.

The current Green Dragon incarnation is fun, serves good bar food and often features lobster specials at lunch. It is located on Marshall Street, one of the oldest most authentically historic in Boston. Right next door is the Ebenezer Hancock House – which was built in 1767 by John Hancock’s uncle, inherited by John, and then given to his brother, Ebenezer. Ebenezer became the deputy paymaster to the Continental Army.

1742 – Union Oyster House, 44 Union Street, 617-227-2750

The Union Oyster House started serving food in 1826. It is the oldest continuously operating restaurant in the US. The building, which dates from 1742 (although other references place it as early as 1713), started its life as a dress shop. At that time, the harbor actually came up to the dress shop’s back door. Since then, all the land you see is filled-in.

The legendary Oyster Bar at the front of the restaurant is beautiful. Daniel Webster sat daily at this bar and drank a tall tumbler of brandy and water with each half-dozen oysters – usually eating at least six plates.

1760 – Chart House (John Hancock’s Counting House), 60 Long Wharf, 617-227-1576

The Chart House was originally the Gardiner House, built on Long Wharf around 1760. Later, it was John Hancock’s counting house. It is the oldest building still in use on Long Wharf.

A short walk from the Freedom Trail, it is the most elegant restaurant in this collection. For the warm weather, it has outside seating with a great view of the harbor and downtown Boston. Check for discounts on food.

1780 – Warren Tavern, 2 Pleasant Street, Charlestown (near Bunker Hill), 617-241-8142

Built in 1780, the Warren Tavern was reportedly the first building raised after the British burned Charlestown during the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. It is named for Doctor and General Joseph Warren, the famous Patriot who died fighting at Bunker Hill. The Tavern has been host to George Washington, Paul Revere, and Benjamin Franklin. Try the Paul Revere Burger.

1827 – Durgin Park, 340 Faneuil Hall Place (Quincy Market North Building), 617-227-2038

This iconic restaurant, housed in an old warehouse, has been around since 1827, although a restaurant has operated at this spot since 1742. Famous for its old Yankee recipes, it is a real flash from the past and one of the oldest places you can dine in Boston. Upstairs diners sit communally at long tables with other patrons. For the pleasant weather, there is also outside seating overlooking Quincy Market.

It is a lot of fun and one of the few places you can get Indian Pudding. The roast beef overflows the plate. One of the best!

1875 – Cafe Marliave, 10 Bosworth Street 617-422-0004

The oldest Italian restaurant in Boston, the Marliave dates from 1875. It has intimate outside seating for the summer months. It is only a short block away from Old City Hall and King’s Chapel stops on the Freedom Trail.

The Marliave is located right above of the Province House Steps (1679-1864). The Province House was the official Royal Governor’s residence during the Revolutionary period.

Have a great trip!